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Why DIY fly screens are great for doors

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DIY fly screens tend to be very popular for windows but they’re also great for doors.

Many people choose to use fly curtains, ribbons or beads on their doors as they allow easy access and are relatively low cost. However, these don’t form a seal with the door meaning that insects can still get through (and they’re not very pretty!)

Our fly screens for doors are designed to completely cover the doorway so no insects can get through. The mesh is held tautly in place by the cassette frame, which sticks to your existing door frame so there are no gaps where insects can sneak through.

The retractable design means that our fly screens for doors are easy to open and close allowing easy access to your garden, balcony or patio whilst protecting against insects. Our door fly screens can be used on both single and double doors and feature super-fine insect mesh that lets fresh air in and won’t block your view.

Unlike gaudy fly curtains and chains, our door fly screens are designed to look smart and blend in with your door. All our fly screens are made from high quality, white uPVC, to match most standard white door frames on entrances or conservatories. Plus they’re easy to wipe down and keep clean and won’t scuff or chip.

They’re also as easy, if not even easier, to fit than fly chains or curtains. We cut the screens to size for you and then you simply click the four sides together and stick them on. There’s no tacking to be done and no unsightly hook and loop tape to stick on. The screens are fitted with strong adhesive backing which sticks to your door frame and won’t leave residue or marks if removed.

So if you’re looking for a better way to stop insects getting in through open doors this Spring, DIY fly screens for doors could be just the product you’re looking for. To order, simply download our six step measuring guide and order your door screens online.



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